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Should You Use Mouth Tape For Mewing If You Have Sleep Apnea? What Body Position Is Ideal?

Should You Use Mouth Tape For Mewing If You Have Sleep Apnea? What Body Position Is Ideal?

Mouth Tape For Mewing

Using mouth tape for Mewing has started to pick up in popularity as many are starting to learn about the potential ramifications that mouth breathing can have cosmetically, and on overall health.

It's one thing to consciously force yourself to Mew while you're awake, but Mewing while you are sleeping can be nearly impossible if you are not forcing yourself to breathe through your nose.

During my meeting with my ear nose and throat specialist (ENT) I asked whether it would be a good idea or not for people with inhibited nasal passages to use mouth tape to train themsleves to stop mouth breathing.

He claims that those who would do that are doing themsleves a disservice, because you are putting unnecessary stress on your body to breathe through your nose when it likely cannot get sufficient oxygen in.

You would be sacrificing your health just to force yourself to not use your mouth while sleeping.

For those without inhibited nasal passages (no inflamed turbinates or a deviated septum), he encourages the use of mouth tape though, is it would promote the adoption of nasal breathing 24/7, not just during waking hours.

Should I resolve my inflamed turbinates, he would then advise I try incorporating mouth tape into my nightly routine, but only once I ensure I can breathe comfortably enough through my nose where it isn't putting my health in jeopardy.

Optimal Sleep Position For Those With Sleep Apnea

One thing I've noticed over the years is that my Sleep Apnea seems to be a positioning problem, rather than a signaling problem in my brain.

If I fall at my computer desk sitting upright in a chair, I am able to breathe through my nose comfortably.

However, if I fall asleep laying on my back, gravity seems to cause my relaxed tongue to fall into my throat, rather than staying against my palate the way it should be.

As a result, I only have severe Sleep Apnea when I'm lying on my back, but not in an upright position.

I can actually sleep without my CPAP machine when seated upright.

I asked the doctor if he advises his patients to sleep in a specific body position, such as propped up 90 degrees during sleep to avoid gravity induced airway obstruction.

The doctor claimed that he usually does not and that 45 degrees, not 90, is the recommended angle for those with sleep apnea.

Similar to the angle of a La-Z-Boy reclined chair.

Alternatively, he also suggests sleeping your side to prevent the tongue from obstructing the airway.

I also asked whether sleeping in a propped-up position as opposed to lying down can have decrease the amount of REM sleep you get.

He said no, claiming that the obstruction of the airway is more of the concern rather than the body position itself, and that people with obstructed breathing would find it hard to get to REM sleep anyway.

In other words, it is hard to get adequate deep sleep with an obstructed airway, and body position is not nearly as important as ensuring that the airway is clear in general.

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